LIVING WITH YOUR CONDITION

Are you being treated for gMG but still struggling with your symptoms?

It may be time to discuss with your doctor and consider your treatment options.

Anti-AChR Ab+ gMG and your immune system

Anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive generalized Myasthenia Gravis (anti-AChR Ab+ gMG) is an autoimmune disease, which is a disease that causes part of your immune system to work against yourself.

Normally, a part of the immune system (called complement) is activated to help fight bacteria and other threats.

In people with anti-AChR Ab+ gMG, complement stays activated even when it shouldn’t be and starts to damage the place where your nerves and muscles meet (the neuromuscular junction). This is why your muscles can’t always contract when they should.

Help manage your anti-AChR Ab+ gMG by focusing on complement.

Still experiencing symptoms?

You may still be experiencing symptoms if:

  • Your muscles feel weak
  • You have had to change the way you do certain things because of your gMG symptoms
  • You have difficulty completing the daily activities that make you feel like yourself (like chewing, brushing your teeth/hair, or getting out of a chair)
If you have any of the symptoms above, you should talk about them with your doctor. Be sure to share how they affect your everyday life, too.

Being your own advocate

To help manage your symptoms of gMG, it is important to be your own advocate and continue to tell your doctor when you are experiencing them.

SUPPORT & RESOURCES

Make your next conversation with your doctor more productive

Take charge of your treatment plan by discussing your symptoms and your options with your doctor.

Download discussion guide
PATIENT TOOLS

Assess your gMG symptoms before and during treatment

A Myasthenia Gravis Activities of Daily Living (MG-ADL) assessment is something you may already be doing with your doctor. MG-ADL is a tool that allows you to measure the impact of your gMG symptoms on your daily activities. Print out the assessment and bring it to your next appointment to complete with your doctor.

Download assessment

Stay Connected

Sign up to get the latest news and information about anti-AChR Ab+ gMG and Soliris to help you make the most of your treatment.

Sign up now
IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION INCLUDING BOXED WARNING

SOLIRIS is a medicine that affects your immune system and can lower the ability of your immune system to fight infections.

  • SOLIRIS increases your chance of getting serious and life-threatening meningococcal infections that may quickly become life-threatening and cause death if not recognized and treated early.
  1. You must receive meningococcal vaccines at least 2 weeks before your first dose of SOLIRIS if you are not vaccinated.
  2. If your doctor decided that urgent treatment with SOLIRIS is needed, you should receive meningococcal vaccination as soon as possible.
  3. If you have not been vaccinated and SOLIRIS therapy must be initiated immediately, you should also receive 2 weeks of antibiotics with your vaccinations.
  4. If you had a meningococcal vaccine in the past, you might need additional vaccination. Your doctor will decide if you need additional vaccination.
  5. Meningococcal vaccines reduce but do not prevent all meningococcal infections. Call your doctor or get emergency medical care right away if you get any of these signs and symptoms of a meningococcal infection: headache with nausea or vomiting, headache and fever, headache with a stiff neck or stiff back, fever, fever and a rash, confusion, muscle aches with flu-like symptoms, and eyes sensitive to light.

Your doctor will give you a Patient Safety Card about the risk of meningococcal infection. Carry it with you at all times during treatment and for 3 months after your last SOLIRIS dose. It is important to show this card to any doctor or nurse to help them diagnose and treat you quickly.

SOLIRIS is only available through a program called the SOLIRIS REMS. Before you can receive SOLIRIS, your doctor must enroll in the SOLIRIS REMS program; counsel you about the risk of meningococcal infection; give you information and a Patient Safety Card about the symptoms and your risk of meningococcal infection (as discussed above); and make sure that you are vaccinated with the meningococcal vaccine and, if needed, get revaccinated with the meningococcal vaccine. Ask your doctor if you are not sure if you need to be revaccinated.

SOLIRIS may also increase the risk of other types of serious infections. Certain people may be at risk of serious infections with gonorrhea. Certain fungal infections (Aspergillus) may occur if you take SOLIRIS and have a weak immune system or a low white blood cell count.

Who should not receive SOLIRIS?

Do not receive SOLIRIS if you have a meningococcal infection or have not been vaccinated against meningitis infection unless your doctor decides that urgent treatment with SOLIRIS is needed.

Before you receive SOLIRIS, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions, including if you: have an infection or fever, are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, and are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if SOLIRIS will harm your unborn baby or if it passes into your breast milk.

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements which could affect your treatment. It is important that you have all recommended vaccinations before you start SOLIRIS, receive 2 weeks of antibiotics if you immediately start SOLIRIS, and stay up-to-date with all recommended vaccinations during treatment with SOLIRIS.

What are the possible side effects of SOLIRIS?

SOLIRIS can cause serious side effects including serious infusion-related reactions. Tell your doctor or nurse right away if you get any of these symptoms during your SOLIRIS infusion: chest pain; trouble breathing or shortness of breath; swelling of your face, tongue, or throat; and feel faint or pass out. If you have an infusion-related reaction to SOLIRIS, your doctor may need to infuse SOLIRIS more slowly, or stop SOLIRIS.

The most common side effects in people with gMG treated with SOLIRIS include: muscle and joint (musculoskeletal) pain.

Tell your doctor about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. These are not all the possible side effects of SOLIRIS. For more information, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit MedWatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

INDICATION
What is SOLIRIS?

SOLIRIS is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with a disease called generalized myasthenia gravis (gMG) who are anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody positive. It is not known if SOLIRIS is safe and effective in children with gMG.

Please see the full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide for SOLIRIS, including Boxed WARNING regarding serious and life-threatening meningococcal infections.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION INCLUDING BOXED WARNING

SOLIRIS is a medicine that affects your immune system and can lower the ability of your immune system to fight infections.

  • SOLIRIS increases your chance of getting serious and life-threatening meningococcal infections that may quickly become life-threatening and cause death if not recognized and treated early.
  1. You must receive meningococcal vaccines at least 2 weeks before your first dose of SOLIRIS if you are not vaccinated.
  2. If your doctor decided that urgent treatment with SOLIRIS is needed, you should receive meningococcal vaccination as soon as possible.
  3. If you have not been vaccinated and SOLIRIS therapy must be initiated immediately, you should also receive 2 weeks of antibiotics with your vaccinations.
  4. If you had a meningococcal vaccine in the past, you might need additional vaccination. Your doctor will decide if you need additional vaccination.
  5. Meningococcal vaccines reduce but do not prevent all meningococcal infections. Call your doctor or get emergency medical care right away if you get any of these signs and symptoms of a meningococcal infection: headache with nausea or vomiting, headache and fever, headache with a stiff neck or stiff back, fever, fever and a rash, confusion, muscle aches with flu-like symptoms, and eyes sensitive to light.

Your doctor will give you a Patient Safety Card about the risk of meningococcal infection. Carry it with you at all times during treatment and for 3 months after your last SOLIRIS dose. It is important to show this card to any doctor or nurse to help them diagnose and treat you quickly.

SOLIRIS is only available through a program called the SOLIRIS REMS. Before you can receive SOLIRIS, your doctor must enroll in the SOLIRIS REMS program; counsel you about the risk of meningococcal infection; give you information and a Patient Safety Card about the symptoms and your risk of meningococcal infection (as discussed above); and make sure that you are vaccinated with the meningococcal vaccine and, if needed, get revaccinated with the meningococcal vaccine. Ask your doctor if you are not sure if you need to be revaccinated.

SOLIRIS may also increase the risk of other types of serious infections. Certain people may be at risk of serious infections with gonorrhea. Certain fungal infections (Aspergillus) may occur if you take SOLIRIS and have a weak immune system or a low white blood cell count.

Who should not receive SOLIRIS?

Do not receive SOLIRIS if you have a meningococcal infection or have not been vaccinated against meningitis infection unless your doctor decides that urgent treatment with SOLIRIS is needed.

Before you receive SOLIRIS, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions, including if you: have an infection or fever, are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, and are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if SOLIRIS will harm your unborn baby or if it passes into your breast milk.

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements which could affect your treatment. It is important that you have all recommended vaccinations before you start SOLIRIS, receive 2 weeks of antibiotics if you immediately start SOLIRIS, and stay up-to-date with all recommended vaccinations during treatment with SOLIRIS.

What are the possible side effects of SOLIRIS?

SOLIRIS can cause serious side effects including serious infusion-related reactions. Tell your doctor or nurse right away if you get any of these symptoms during your SOLIRIS infusion: chest pain; trouble breathing or shortness of breath; swelling of your face, tongue, or throat; and feel faint or pass out. If you have an infusion-related reaction to SOLIRIS, your doctor may need to infuse SOLIRIS more slowly, or stop SOLIRIS.

The most common side effects in people with gMG treated with SOLIRIS include: muscle and joint (musculoskeletal) pain.

Tell your doctor about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. These are not all the possible side effects of SOLIRIS. For more information, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit MedWatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

INDICATION
What is SOLIRIS?

SOLIRIS is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with a disease called generalized myasthenia gravis (gMG) who are anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibody positive. It is not known if SOLIRIS is safe and effective in children with gMG.

Please see the full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide for SOLIRIS, including Boxed WARNING regarding serious and life-threatening meningococcal infections.